Friday, June 29, 2012

August Charles Farschman--Real Estate Mogul


     The scanned Elyria, Ohio newspapers out on ancestry have provided me with a new focus on my husbands, paternal great grandfather, August Charles Farschman--real estate mogul. ;-D


    Through the early 1900's, August had a candy, tobacco and billard establishment on Broadway in Lorain.  To supplement his income, he also was employed in a local dairy and at the National Stove Company. By 1920 August had purchased property on 12th Avenue (Street?) in Lorain and two years later he owned property in Axel where he ran a gasoline station and grocery store until about 1932.

     The following newspaper clippings show that August had some additional real estate transactions in Lorain County.









Other Flipside Blogs for August Charles Farschman:

Farschman History--The "C" Stands for Charles
Treasure Chest Thursday--August C. Farschman Money Bag

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© 2012, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser

Thursday, June 28, 2012

Mont Mettie Munger--Writer, Composer, Musician and Vaudevillian


      I have been hard at work lately blogging about my maternal Stark Family.  Some work is new and others, like this one, is an update of a previous blog written in 2012.  I wrote a blog about the Munger's back in 2009 as a Tombstone Tuesday.  It was very skimpy.  The recently rewritten one, Mont Mettie Munger and Lucy Stark Munger, is not.  

     While I was researching the Munger Family for the umpteenth time, I google searched my maternal grand uncle, Mont Mettie Munger.  The usual stuff showed up.....except one and it is the new information I have been able to add to both blogs.  It was most definitely a genealogy happy dance moment.

Granny Stark in front of the player piano
Mont's mother-in-law

     Mont Mettie Munger, my maternal grand uncle, has been quite a man of mystery. As I mentioned in the Munger blog, I have no stories of him other than my mother, who was in junior high school, telling of Uncle Mont sitting at Aunt Dorothy's player piano and tickling the ivories with GREAT showmanship.  My Mom thought him very funny pretending to play the piano for the gathered family.  I now know that Uncle Mont was quite musical and could play the piano for real.   

The 2012 Blog Story

     Back in 2012, for some unknown reason, I was putting Mont's name into the google search engine and up popped some new and interesting information.  I found three Library of Congress listings for Mont M. Munger, Pittsburgh, composer and author.  Wow....somehow that little piece of family history was lost through the decades. 

This is not Mont's song.  It is my graphic art

     It appears that Uncle Mont composed two little ditties back in 1938:  On a Honeymoon Up in the Sky and Do You Remember Dear.  Uncle Mont was not on Tin Pan Alley when he crafted his two songs and neither were on the Pittsburgh Top Ten; however, an accomplishment none the less.  I wonder if the untimely death of his wife, Lucy Stark Munger in 1927, were the basis of the songs.

     One of Mont's songs, On A Honeymoon Up in the Sky, was copyrighted, but not published.  His second song, Do You Remember Dear, was copyrighted; however, the listing does not mention whether he published it.  These are the only songs by Mont Munger that I have found to date.


      Uncle Mont may have used a typewriter to write the manuscript for his book.  He was proficient using one.  Back when he first came to Pittsburgh circa 1908, he was employed as a stenographer.

     Song of Heaven, a 265 page vanity press book, was published in 1958.  It would be fun to find a copy.  I imagine it was given out to family members and friends; however, it has been lost to the ages.....unfortunately, probably is in Pittsburgh land fills.

The 2021 Story


     Well, NO it has NOT been lost to the ages.  This is the happy dance!  When I was google searching Mont last week, up popped an eBay sale for Mont M. Munger's book, Song of Heaven.  Now mind you, when I first wrote this blog back in 2012, I was taking it on faith that my maternl grand uncle Mont Munger wrote the book.  Seriously, how many Mont M. Munger's could be around in 1958.  I wrote the seller to see if there was some additional information about the author.  I was rewarded with definite proof that Uncle Mont wrote the book AND there was a photo and personal information on the dust jacket.  It is the first and only photo of him I have seen.  Thank goodness the dust jacket was still on the book.  Without that dust jacket, I would not have said--SOLD.  


     What I already knew from previous research--Mont's, birth place and his stationery business.  What was a new eye opener--his vaudeville days.  I was able to find some information on his touring and entertaining at the Crystal Theater.  No wonder he was so entertaining on the player piano at family gatherings in the late 20's and early 30's.

If you are interested on the small amount of vaudeville performances I have found, it is on the blog, Mont Mettie Munger and Lucy Stark Munger.



A portion of the Table of Contents



     Song of Heaven took Uncle Mont fifteen years to complete.  It is a book of poetry made from rhyming couplets. The thrust of the philosophy contained within the poems is that man must depend on the Divine Spirit to obtain contentment.  It is important for the Spirit to have a victory over the physical and material existence.
      
     
Rewritten February, 2021  
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© 2021, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Philip Seewald--Jeweler and Clock Maker Extraordinaire


     Philip Seewald and Louisa Lang Seewald are the maternal 3x great grandparents of my husband, Ted.  Philip is the son of Ludwig Seewald and Sophia Correll.  He was born on September 26 1799 in Sippersfeld, Bavarian Palatinate, Germany.  Louisa, daughter of George Ludwig Henry Lang and Catherine Scheutz, was born on February 26, 1802 in Bavaria, Germany.

     The immigration and gradual movement across pioneer America of the Seewalds from Philadelphia to Tiffin, Ohio is well documented in the History of Seneca County published in 1880  by William Lang, page 255-257.  As noted in the books article, all three of Philips sons; John Louis Seewald, William Henry Seewald and John Philip Seewald, carried on the family trade of jeweler.

     At the end of the Seewald section of William Lang's book, it mentions that Philip Seewald began making tower clocks in his later years.  Lang credits Philip Seewald with the building of the clock located in the clock tower near the Seneca County Courthouse.  I  found an article in the Advertiser Tribune, Tiffin's local newspaper, that groundbreaking for the courthouse was begun in 1883.  The tower clock was made by Seewald and Hart, Tiffin, Ohio.  Since Philip Seewald died in 1878, it begs the question--was the original clock in the tower built by Philip or his son, John Louis?  Or, perhaps, the original clock was simply in a tower standing alone in the Tiffin town square before the Seneca County Courthouse was built.

     Another one of Philip's tower clocks is still in operation in Hudson, Michigan.  According to an article in the Toledo Blade, March 1, 1982, page 6, Future of Old Clock Has Hudson Wound Up, the Hudson clock was originally in Fremont, Ohio and was subsequently moved to Hudson in front of John Philip Seewald's jewelry store.



     The Seneca County Courthouse and clock tower were razed early this year following protests by local groups and even a failed request to the Ohio Supreme Court.  There was a quote by a local resident that I found in a Toledo Blade article, "Watching the 107-foot clock tower of Seneca County's 1884 courthouse come down piece by dusty piece Thursday, the resident conceded most people considered the tower ugly." "I wasn't too fond of it either, been but the original one was underneath it and it could've been brought back," he said.  I know my Aunt said that the clock that was destroyed was not the Seewald clock; however, it seems from the above quote, the razed tower and clock may have been built over the original one.

     I have been working lately on my husband's Seewald genealogy and it was amazing to learn just how many descendants of  Philip Seewald continued his business in jewelry and clock making.  The Seewalds fanned out across America and generations have provided new customers with beautiful articles of jewelry and time pieces.

Other spellings of Philip Seewald:  Phillip Seewald, Johann Phillip Seewald

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Seewald Cousins

Third Cousins Once Removed
Elaine, Ted and Gloria

     Why do I blog????  Here is a recent instance.  Back in January I wrote about my son finding a piece of his Lang history at the Western Reserve Historical Society in Cleveland, Ohio at What Could I Say But Good Eye. That piece generated a flurry of e-mail activity from two women who also called the Lang Family of Tiffin, Ohio their family. 

     After plenty of travel planning on their part, Gloria and Elaine arrived in Ohio last week digging into their Seewald/Lang roots.  My husband and I had the pleasure of their company here in Cleveland on Saturday for dinner at The Blue Point Grill.  I'm afraid we occupied our table for well over three hours--probably to the consternation of the restaurant...lol

     Ted's cousins continued on their genealogy trip to Hudson, Michigan where their mutual grandfather, Philip Seewald, built the town clock, which is still in existence.  Philip Seewald is Elaine and Gloria's great great grandfather and he is Ted's great great great grandfather.

     Two days were spent in Tiffin, talking with Ted's aunt and uncle, visiting Greenfield Cemetery where so many Tiffin pioneers are buried and taking in the Tiffin Historical Society and Tiffin Glass Museum. 

     Their final day in Ohio will be in Berlin--a non genealogical day--browsing the numerous Amish shops.

     Elaine and Gloria....I don't know if you have this newspaper clipping.  It is a wonderful look at your Seewald ancestry in Amarillo, Texas.




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Thursday, April 26, 2012

Aunt Pat

PATRICIA MADDEN HUGHES
2002
     Last night a cherished family member passed from this life to the next following a courageous battle with cancer.  Aunt Pat was like a comet passing through my Hughes family's lives scattering love, light and energy to everyone she met. 

1985 Aunt Pat with Uncle Ed and Edna Hughes

     She was my Uncle John's second wife and I first had the pleasure of meeting her when she accompanied him to Cousin Karen's wedding in Pittsburgh in 1985.  Have you ever met someone for the first time and instinctively knew you would want to get to know them better--spend more time with them???  That was my first reaction to Aunt Pat.  She was full of energy and charisma.  A pinch on the cheek for Garrett, a big kiss for Aric and for Ted....well, she exclaimed, "Who is that FUNNY MAN!!!"  "Funny Man" became Ted's nickname for the next twenty seven years.  That first meeting she captivated us with her wit and sincerity. 

Uncle John and Aunt Pat
Fran and Lee's wedding 1986

     Through the years, I was always anxious to know if Aunt Pat would be attending whatever family gathering was on the docket.  She had a joie de vivre.  Now, don't get me wrong.  Aunt Pat had her ups and downs and fought a few demons during her lifetime, but always seemed to do it with grace and style. 

Aunt Pat and Uncle John at Grams'
90th birthday--1988

     She was a multifaceted woman.....not just fun and games, but also a good counselor.  Aunt Pat was able to put her thumb right on a problem and gave thoughtful, expert advice.

Aunt Pat enjoying a piece of cake at Megan's
high school graduation party 2002

     I had two occasions to really spend some quality time with my aunt.  The first was following Megan's high school graduation party.  We all gathered at Cousin Phyllis' home and Aunt Pat and I sat for hours looking through my Hughes picture book.  I marveled at the stories she shared.....thoughts of my Uncle John regarding his parents and great grandmother.....items that he had, up to that point, only shared with Pat. 

Aunt Pat teaching me a few tricks
of her selling skills--2002

     Second, when the family gathered to plan and have the Fun With Judy event.  Aunt Pat arrived with her usual excitement; her arms full of bags of food.  She proceeded to literally throw together a delicious chili out of canned products.  Was it called Seven Can Chili????  Next she sat down with me and we gathered up and priced all the items that we were selling in a garage sale during the Fun With Judy day.  I felt like I was sitting at the feet of a master.  I was so into auctions and garage sales that year and Aunt Pat was a seller for house sales--she REALLY knew her stuff.  To say that I was in awe would be an understatement.

Hughes Family gathers for Katie's high school grad party
2006
The last time I saw my aunt was at Katie's graduation party in 2006.  It was so wonderful to feel her kiss on my cheek and warm embrace. 

Rest in Peace my dear Aunt Pat.  I know you have been warmly welcomed up in heaven and are spreading your effervescent personality to all you meet.

Identified left to right; siblings - 
"Aunt Pat", Joseph "Joe" Madden, Rosemary Madden-Allan
Shared by Phaedra Madden



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© 2012, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser

Sunday, March 4, 2012

Stories in Stone--Drechsler Building in Oak Park, Illinois


Sandwiched in between various much newer or newly refurbished buildings on Lake Street in Oak Park, Illinois is the Drechsler Building built in 1898. I was able to find some information regarding the building on two other websites along with brief biographies the occupants when it was constructed.  Although the number currently is 1112 Lake Street, it was 1116 Lake Street back in the 1920's and may have even been 135 Lake in 1910.  Numbers changed as additional buildings were added along the main business street of Oak Park. 


Oak Park resident, Frank Lloyd Wright, definately did not draw up the blueprint for this structure ;-).  Information found on the net on page 23 at, ARCHITECTURAL SURVEY Downtown Oak Park and The Avenue Business District Oak Park, Historic Preservation Commission, Conducted in 1975, Updated 1981 and 2005, lists the architect as E.E. Roberts and the style as Queen Anne.  Charles Drechsler is listed as the first owner.

"The building is 4 stories and is 23’ x 142’. The walls and foundation dates to a 1933 remodel. There was a building restoration in 1970 by Fred Burghardt. Minor alterations to the storefront occurred in 1975. There is a copper bay at the third floor level. Metal cornice and brackets with imposing brick parapet and coping. Bedford limestone trim. Exterior restoration underway in 2005."  

Charles Frederick Drechsler, son of William Henry Drechsler and Anna Heitmann, was born on April 9, 1872 in Leyden Township, Cook County, Illinois. Leyden Township comprises an area northwest of Oak Park.  I have also seen Charles' mother listed as Wilhelmina Hectmann; however the maiden name could be a transcription error.


Charles married Sophia P. Sievert on July 10, 1895 in St. John's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Harlem, Cook County, Illinois.  At this time, Harlem was located in what is today called Forest Park.  Charles was already a resident of Oak Park at the time of his marriage.  Sophia, also known as Sophy, was born in 1875, the daughter of John and Carolyn Sievert, pioneer settlers of the area now known as River Forest, Illinois. 

Charles was already self employed as an undertaker and embalmer working in Oak Park.  The Drechsler's had two sons who are enumerated on the 1900 Illinois Census, Ralph, born October 1896 and Irwin, born January 1900.  Both boys must have died between 1900 and 1910.  A third son, Earl August Martin Drechsler was born on November 12, 1905, probably in Oak Park, Cook County, Illinois. 

I was able to find a brief biography of both Charles and Sophy on line at A Partial History of Forest Home and German Waldheim Cemeteries;

"Sophy Drechsler was the daughter of John and Carolyn Sievert, one of the first families to settle in what is now River Forest. As she was growing up, the area was so sparsely settled that she was the only one in her graduating class at Harlem School. In 1895 she married Charles Drechsler, a young man determined to succeed in business.

At an early age, Drechsler had left his family's farm in Leyden Township and trained with J. W. Senne, an early undertaker in Forest Park and Oak Park. When he was only twenty-two years old, Drechsler bought out Senne and continued to operate the under taking and ambulance services. In addition, he managed a wide range of business ventures that included repairing and upholstering furniture, renting fireproof storage space, moving furniture, and eventually, selling Franklin automobiles.

In 1898, Drechsler commissioned the noted architect E. E. Roberts to design a four-story brick building, which still stands in Oak Park at 1116 Lake Street, just west of Marion Street. The building housed and advertised all his various business ventures, as shown in the drawing here After his death, Sophy Drechsler kept the funeral home operating and served as its bookkeeper until her son Earl completed school. She remained active in the family business until her own death."


The Charles Drechsler Family lived above the business at 1116 Lake Street for several decades.  By 1910, Charles' younger brother, William Henry Drechsler, had joined the embalming business.  I noticed that Charles F. Drechsler was the undertaker for both of his parents. 

Find A Grave photograph
Scott Lewis
Charles Frederick Drechsler died on February 15  1925 at the age of fifty-two.  Sophy died in 1953.  Both are buried in Forest Home Cemetery, Forest Park, Illinois.

William H. Drechsler continued the business until Charles and Sophy's son, Earl A. Drechsler, graduated from University of Michigan and then he took over the business.

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© 2012, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser

Wednesday, February 29, 2012

LEAP YEAR CHUCKLE


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I'm In--The 1940 Census


I have signed up to help index the 1940 census. I have been transcribing for Family Search for over a year primarily working on the World War I draft registrations from various states.  It's fun and easy.    I hope you will pitch in and help with this effort, too.
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© 2012, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Tombstone Tuesday--Matella A. Lepard Hull


     Matella A. Lepard Hull is my second cousin, twice removed.  She was the daughter of Isaac Lepard and Sarah Ann Woollett. Born on February 8, 1859 in Attica, Venice Township, Seneca County, Ohio, Matella lived her entire life within the small farming community. 

Matella A. Lepard Hull
     
On February 7, 1878, she married  Abraham W. Hull, son of Michael Hull and Barbara Free Hull.  Abraham was born on October 3, 1863 was also raised in Venice Township. 

     The Hulls raised three children on the Hull farm outside town; Arza B Hull, Ida Mary Hull Wilhelm and Mina B. Hull Songer.  



     Matella died at age eight-one on May 24, 1941 at her home in Attica.  She is buried beside her husband, Abraham W. Hull, in the Attica Venice Joint Cemetery.
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Monday, February 27, 2012

Destination: Carnegie Library of Sandusky, Ohio and a BIG SURPRISE

Over the weekend my brother and I planned a little Monday day trip to Sandusky, Ohio.  Ken has become very involved with a new church and I wanted to see it; however, when Ken mentioned that there was a Carnegie Library in town which once housed a concert hall complete with a beautiful organ, I was onboard.  Readers might remember past blogs of our searches for Carnegie's that provided more than a library for the lucky community where it was built. 

We were warmly welcomed at the church and given a full tour of the building and the various classrooms.  As a gift I was given a CD of the worship team's music.

Former Erie County Jail

After lunch, we made our way into Sandusky.  Ken already knew the location of the library.  Out came the camera....Miss Snap Happy was primed and ready!  Next to the library is the old Erie County jail.  Check out the photo....nice digs for the sheriff.  Today the library has been expanded and extends into the building that once housed the jail.  More on that later in another blog.....

Elegant front of
Sandusky Carnegie Library

It's always a good trip when Ken is part of the travel team.  He has such a warm way with complete strangers....that winning smile and hardy laugh.  He totally charmed the lovely lady librarian at the information desk.  Within minutes she was giving us the most informative guided tour of the building.  

As she was finishing up, she asked if we had been down to the Archives Room.   Archives...."So," says Linda,"Does that mean you have a large genealogy section in the library?"  Her reply was "yes".  Then somewhere.....in the back of my mind.....I remembered one of my favorite blogs, Graveyard Rabbit of Sandusky Bay......Carnegie Library of Sandusky located on Sandusky Bay..... Can you hear the light bulb clicking on in my head ;-) 

"Well I read a blog about cemeteries in Erie County and I bet the writer does her research here," says myself.  The librarian asked who the blogger was and my reply, "Dorene".  The librarians eyes danced with delight and she responded, "Dorene! Dorene works here and is probably downstairs right now!"

Flipside meets Graveyard Rabbit of Sandusky Bay

We followed the librarian down to the lower level and there was Dorene sitting in front of her computer.  I walked over and said, "Hi Dorene, Linda from Flipside."  What a grand meeting.  Hugs and smiles....Geneabloggers are such a warm and nurturing community.  For both of us, it was the first time we had met a fellow Geneablogger in person.

I have followed Graveyard Rabbit of Sandusky Bay for several years.  Dorene's blog is well reseached and she is such an engaging writer.  The reader can always count on photos and often newspaper articles on the folks belonging to the individual tombstones.  If you are not part of her following, I encourage you strongly to hop over and give her a look.

Serendipity ruled the day.
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Tuesday, February 21, 2012

Tombstone Tuesday--Peter Gemmell, Fenwick Covenanter


     Back in 2005, while my husband, brother and I were traveling around the lowlands of Scotland, we stayed a day or two in Fenwick, Scotland near the town of Kilmarnock.  A large portion of the trip was spent looking for anything Gemmell--not in my surname line, but belonging to a friend of my brother.

     The second day of our stay in a wonderful B & B in Fenwick (pronounced Fenick), I saw a pamphlet in the lounge area for the Fenwick Old Parish Kirk.  AND, a Gemmell was buried there.  Suddenly, we were all in the rental car and heading for Low Fenwick and the Kirk.  As I remember, it was a dark and dreary afternoon--the perfect setting for a wander in an old cemetery.




     What an exciting find this turned out to be.  Firstly, I had either forgotten or never knew about the history of the Scottish Covenanters and shame on me as a life long Presbyterian!  The kirkyard was full of them....8 to be exact, which is more than in any other Scottish burial ground. 

    I found a useful site called Scottish Covenanter Memorials Association, which defined covenanter, "Simply stated, the Covenanters were those people in Scotland who signed the National Covenant in 1638. They signed this Covenant to confirm their opposition to the interference by the Stuart kings in the affairs of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland."

     Second, I don't know what I was thinking....maybe my mind was washed out by the rain....but I only photographed the one tombstone we were in search of...again, shame on me! 



     Finally, had I been able to do a little research on the Old Parish Kirk, I would have known ahead of time that the church faces east/west and is an odd angle within its boundary.  The kirk was built in 1643 in the shape of a Greek cross.  Note the guard posts at the gates that were built so that families could protect their dead from the resurrectionists.

The Peter Gemmell tombstone reads:





"Here lyes the corpse of Peter Gemmell,
who was shot by Nisbet and his party,
anno 1685, for bearing his faithful testimony to the cause of Christ.
Aged 21 years.

‘This man, like holy anchorites of old,
For conscience sake was thrust from house and hold;
Bloodthirsty red-coats cut his prayers short,
And even his dying groans were made their sport.
Ah, Scotland! breach of solemn vow repent,
Or bloody crimes will bring thy punishment.’"


     Electric Scotland on line has Ramble Round Kilmarnock, by Archibald R. Adamson.  There are two excellent chapters on the Fenwick Old Parish Kirk, Chapter VII and Chapter VIII.

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© 2012, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser