Monday, March 30, 2020

Social Distancing in the Age of Covid-19--A Positive

The Back Story
   
     There was a day, fifty years ago, the first year Ted and I were married, probably in the spring of 1970, that we purchased our first piece of furniture.  I have always been in love with antiques, perhaps that is the reason I love genealogy.  Ted and I saw in the local Tiffin, Ohio newspaper that there was a sale of antique furniture at a farm outside town.  Not being from Tiffin, I have no idea where we drove that day.  I think it was somewhere out River Road, perhaps near what is called The Screaming Lady Bridge.



     In those days we did not have much cha-ching and antiques were a popular commodity.  We wandered about the collection of sale items spaced here and there on the front yard of the farm house.  So many interesting pieces.  One, in particular grabbed our attention at the same time.  It was an old secretary with a writing desk and space on the side for books, enclosed by a bent glass door.  I had to have it!  The price was not too dear.  Ted found the sellers and bought it.

     As we continued looking around, who should be run into but Ted's parents, his sister and his brother in law.  His mother was rather unhappy.  She had seen a piece of furniture that reminded her of one her mother once owned.  Unfortunately, it was already sold.  You can guess which piece it was and who the new owners were.  She probably carried that one to her grave.

     The secretary has been a prized possession for fifty years.  It has been moved from Tiffin to Boston, from Boston to North Reading, MA, from North Reading back to Tiffin.  From Tiffin to Cleveland, from Cleveland to Lakewood, OH, another two moves within Lakewood and finally it has spent over 30 years in North Olmsted.  Moved with great care, the bent glass door removed.  Not often do you find these secretary's with the original bent glass.  This one is intact.

The Positive

     So, trying to stay busy while being laid off and social distancing in the house, I decided to paint many of the rooms and doors in my house.  To be honest, I am not the worlds most engaged cleaner.  I have always worked and in my free time find other more interesting ways to occupy my time than deep cleaning the rooms in my house.  To date, the most challenging room has been the living room.  It has not been painted since 2002 and probably not deep cleaned since about 2010. 


     Today, in preparation of painting the first wall, I had to move that old antique secretary away from the wall.  Although I did not have much light, something on the back of the piece caught my eye.  Something I had never noticed before.  It was a sales tag nailed to the back of the secretary with the names of the manufacturer and the buyer.  What sweet find.


     FOR: 
 W. H. Hetrick
Oak Harbor, Ohio

FROM:  
BAKERS
Manufacturers of Furniture
Allegan, Michigan

     Now the genealogist in me is kicking in.  W. H. Hetrick, could be William H. Hetrick who has census reports in Oak Harbor, Ottawa County, Ohio in 1920 and 1930.  William was born in August, 1869, Sandusky County, Ohio.  I found that William was a salesman in a furniture store on the 1910 census.  So rather than William becoming the first owner of the secretary, it was probably being shipped to him at the furniture store in Oak Harbor where he was employed.  I had ball parked the secretary as having been made around 1910-1920.  By 1920, William was the manager of the store and continued to work there into the 1930 census.



     I was able to find William's obituary.  A very enterprising man, he was a furniture dealer and owned a funeral home.  He was a member of the school board and the US Lutheran Evangelical Church in America.  William married to Rozella Setzler in 1891 and together they raised five children; Lloyd William Hetrick, Viola R. Hetrick Hoedt, Grace L. Hetrick, Edwin H. Hetrick and Norman John Hetrick.  On March 26, 1938, at age sixty eight, William died at his home on Ottawa Street in Oak Harbor.  He is buried at Oak Harbor Union Cemetery, Oak Harbor, Ohio.   

More Research




      So, William was also a funeral director and owned a funeral parlor.  Back to google.  

     Taken from the Robinson-Walker website. " A century ago, it was common for furniture store owners to get into funeral service as well--after all they were the ones building the beautiful caskets.  This was the case for Hetrick & Son Furniture in downtown Oak Harbor back in the 1920's.  The W.H. Hetrick family opened Oak Harbors first funeral home in a large Victorian home that was built in the late 1800s at 165 East Water Street.  After World War II, the Hetricks sold the funeral home to Glenn and Mary Robinson."   Today the funeral home is known as the Robinson-Walker Funeral Home.  

     Often funeral directors lived in the houses where they had their business.  I can find no evidence William lived at the East Water Street house.  Federal census reports list the family at 352 Oak Street in 1910 and 312 Ottawa Street in 1920 and 1930.


     However, on the 1940 census (1935 and 1940), living at 165 East Water Street are two of William and Rozella's sons with their wives; Lloyd William Hetrick, listed as the director of a funeral home and Norman James Hetrick listed as a clerk in retail furniture.  This census was after Williams death.  The sons were living upstairs of the actual funeral parlor.  I also found on Lloyd William's World War II draft registration card that he and his wife, Ethel, lived at 165 East Water Street and his place of business was listed as the furniture store at 169 West Water Street.


   I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. All comments are welcome; however, if they are inappropriate, they will not be published.    PLEASE post your e-mail in the comment section if you would like to network about a particular surname or topic. I will capture it for my use only and not include it when I publish your comment.
© 2020, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser


Tuesday, March 24, 2020

Vilender Lanham Pool- My Paternal Great Great Great Great Grandmother

     

     I was hoping that I had already written about some of my pioneer families out on my website.  It would have made blogging so much easier...just a cut and paste and add new info.  Denied!!!  Their page on the website is under construction.

     Vilender, daughter of William Lanham and Catherine Ferguson Lanham, was born about 1785 in Monongalia County, (West) Virginia.  The Lanham Family, along with Catherine's parents, John and Bathsheba Griffith Ferguson and many of her siblings all removed from Prince Georges County, Maryland to a new area called Morgans Town in Monongalia County.  They  are counted as the early  pioneer settlers of the area. 

     Vilender had an older brother, Alexander Ferguson Lanham and a younger sister, Mary Lanham.  If other children were born to William and Catherine Lanham, they are unknown.

     William Lanham was a saddler and farmer.  He was able to purchase numerous pieces of land and lots in Morgans Town. 



      Thirty year old Vilender married twenty eight year old Asby Pool, son of William and Esther Pool, in Monongalia County, (West) Virginia.  The marriage was preformed on September 26, 1815 by Rev. Joseph A. Shackelford, a friend and fellow minister of Asby Pool. 

     Asby was born about 1788 near Hanging Rock, Hampshire County, Virginia.  Asby was admitted to the Methodist Episcopal Church's ministry on March 9, 1810 .  He was minister on the Redstone circuit when he married Vilender.  Asby was able to purchase  three lots in Morgantown by 1838.  He also was instrumental in setting up churches in and around Morgantown.

     Eight children were born to Vilender and Asby.  Their first, a son, William Lanham Pool, is my paternal great great great grandfather.  Other children were; George Henry Pool,  John Asby Pool, Catherine Esther Pool, Alexander Ferguson Pool, Theophilus Pool, Mary Pool and Ann Vilender Pool.  Three sons, William Lanham Pool, George Henry pool and John Asby Pool, all  became ministers.

     Vilender died before 1830.  Perhaps the death was due to child birth as her last child was born in 1828.  There is no record for her death or burial marker.  Asby remarried on September 14, 1830.

**************
Thank you to my friend and cousin, Dr. Robert Poole Wilkins, who unselfishly shared much of his research on the Ferguson, Lanham, Frum and Pool Families during our correspondence in the  1990's.  He sent me a copy of his manuscript, "The Poole Family of Hampshire and Monongalia Counties, West Virginia being principally descendants of the Reverend Asby Poole (1788-1867) of Morgantown, as well as associated members of the Ferguson, Morgan and McRa Families"
         

   
I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. All comments are welcome; however, if they are inappropriate, they will not be published.    PLEASE post your e-mail in the comment section if you would like to network about a particular surname or topic. I will capture it for my use only and not include it when I publish your comment.
© 2020, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser


Sampson Frum Pool--My Paternal Great Great Grandfather



     I am sorely behind blogging about so many of my ancestors.  It is not due to the lack of documents....more due to lack of time to review, write and edit.  I am taking a day or two each week that I am laid off from the coronavirus shutdown of my employment to remedy the situation.

     I will admit that my paternal great great grandfather, Sampson Frum Pool was somewhat of a mystery for many years.  He lived his life on farms outside Morgantown, West Virginia and although I have driven there numerous times to visit cemeteries and spend time in the genealogical library on WVU's campus, there was simply not much information.  Like with many genealogical brick walls, a day comes when they crack open.  Such was the case with Sampson.  To date, unfortunately, I do not have a photo of him, or if I do, he is not identified.

     Monongalia County, (West Virginia) birth records list that Sampson Frum Pool was born on February 20 1843.  The son of Rev William Lanham Pool and Anne Louise Frum Pool he joined two older sisters on his family farm.  By the time Sampson was fourteen the Pool family had grown to nine living children.  One sister died at age one in 1849.

     Sampson, the first son born to the marriage, was named for his maternal grandfather, Sampson Smith Frum.  He was a toddler when his maternal grandmother, Elizabeth VanGilder Frum died; however, his Grandfather Frum lived until Sampson was nineteen.  I am sure they spent time together. 

    As was mentioned in my blog regarding Sampson's wife, Sarah Louise Harner Pool,  Sampson grew up in Morgantown, (West) Virginia during the 1850's and it was a time of great development.  The area was moving from a pioneer village to an actual town with roads, a newspaper, schools and two higher learning academies.

!850 Sabraton Area outside Morgantown.  Pool parcels are marked

     The national unrest building in the 1860's also reached Morgantown.  Sampson was in his young twenties and helping his father with the family farm.  Rev William Lanham Pool mustered in to Company I, 14th West Virginia Infantry in 1862.  At that time Sampson and his brothers were in charge of running the farm.  Perhaps they were also tending to one parcel of land on Aarons Creek given to their mother, Ann Louise Frum Pool by her father, Sampson Smith Frum.


     In October 1863, Sampson is listed as subject to military duty.  He is twenty-one, a laborer and at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania driving for the government.  There is documentation on the West Virginia Archives website, that Sampson Pool was a private in the Monongalia County 14th Militia, Captain L.S.Hayes  B Company--a Union soldier.  These two documents were the first I had seen that mentioned Sampson other than census reports.  Needless to say, it was a happy dance day.  I have not found a pension file, and perhaps his service did not qualify for one.


     A major family historical artifact is a letter written for Sampson by a fellow soldier, dated Martinsburg, May 23, 1863.  The letter is to his mother, Ann Louise Frum Pool and is in response to a letter he received from her .  He talks about the farm, his horse and send his love to family and friends.  Transcription of Sampson Frum Pool's Civil War Letter.  Thanks go to my cousin Phyllis for sending the letter to me years ago.

     As mentioned in the blog about Sampson's wife, I have no idea how the two met; however the family farms and homes were somewhat close together.  Both the Pool and Harner families were pioneers, large and spread throughout the Morgantown area.  I think I will cut and paste the marriage information from Sarah's blog.


     On May 26, 1866 in Monongalia County, West Virginia, twenty three year old, Sampson Frum Pool married twenty two year old, Sarah Louise Harner, daughter of Philip William Harner and Sarah Fearer Harner.  The marriage was performed by Sampson's paternal grandfather, Reverend Asby Pool. 


Sampson Frum Pool's farm is shown at the top of the map
and two properties owned by his mother, Anne Louise Frum Pool,
located on Aarons Creek are shown at the bottom of the map

     Sampson and Sarah lived on a farm north of Morgantown in the Morgan District, almost to Easton, West Virginia.  Together they had eight children; Nettie M. Pool, Sarah Ann PoolJessica B. Pool (my paternal great grandmother), Olive Pool, Annabell Pool, Estelle Pool, Philip Albert Pool and Eleanor Pool.  The siblings appear to be close in their adult years, spending time together on many visits recorded by Sarah Ann and printed in the Charleroi, Pennsylvania newspaper.  Also, at some time after 1900, Pool changed to Poole in many documents.

     It is my understanding that many of the children of William Lanham Pool and Ann Frum Pool cut their ties with their father following the divorce.  My feeling is that Sampson was close to his mother as shown in the Civil War letter.  Sampson was fifty years old when his mother died on August 11, 1893.  Court documents from Monongalia County list the division of Ann's real estate following her death.  Sampson received the road from his sister's, Elizabeth Pool McClure's, property, 35 1/2 acres and $100.00.  His father outlived him by three years.  

     Sampson lived his life on farms.  I imagine there were animals to care for and acres to till, plant and harvest.  Much of the farm work was done by hand with the assistance of wagons, horses and tools.  No big machines like we find on today's farms.  Probably the children assisted with some of the work.  Back in that day, work was gender based.  The girls may have helped with the animals; however, were primarily assisting Sarah with household duties.  The Pool's had only one son, so Philip was out working the land with his father.  I will mention that the Pool children did attend school--all were literate.  I have noticed that Sampson and Sarah were not.  Sampson had a friend write the Civil War letter and Sarah signed papers with an "X".

     I wonder if religion was a part of the Pool Family life?  Sampson came from a line of Methodist preachers.   My guess is yes.  The country church was a source of not only spiritual needs but also social ones.  Today there is a small church, Mount Union United Methodist Church, located across from the cemetery where all the family is buried.  It was located there during the 1800's.  I wonder if that was the church the family attended?  The Pool farm was located up in that area.  Or did they travel by wagon into Morgantown to attend services?      

     

     Sampson Frum Pool was front page news on the day of his death, Tuesday, December 14, 1909 at the age of sixty six.  I was thrilled to find this obituary scrolling through microfilm at the WVU library years back.  It is the reason why obits are so important, giving a family member years later a peek into the persons life.  What I gleaned from this obit.  The Pool farm was near Number 5 coal mines.  His son, Philip Albert Pool, lived near his parents.  My paternal great grandmother, Jessie VanGilder was living in the Sabraton area in 1909 with her four daughters and housed her father
while he died.  Her mother must have continued to stay at the Pool farm.  Dr. Aaron Moore Buchanan of the Morgantown Presbyterian Church was to officiate at the funeral.  Death records indicate that Sampson died from complications of diabetes and was medically attended to by Dr. E. A. Taylor.  




     There is a Pool section and marker at Union Cemetery, Route 119 north ie Point Marion Road.  Sampson was laid to rest there near two of the Pool daughters who died earlier, Estelle and Nettie.  His wife Sarah would join him in 1911.  As mentioned in Sarah's blog, all of the Pool children are buried in Mount Union Cemetery.  Jessie Pool VanGilder is in the VanGilder plot, Philip Albert Poole has his own marker, Annabell Pool Davis has a marker and is in the Pool section.  Eleanor Pool Bashaw, Olive Pool Reeves and Sarah Pool Pinyerd do not have markers.  I am guessing they are buried in the Pool section.  All are listed on Find A Grave.

**********

Court documents outlining the division of Ann Louise Frum Pool's estate was shared by Dr. Robert Poole Wilkins when we corresponded in the 1990's.  He was a genealogist, historian, cousin and friend.  Thank you.


I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. All comments are welcome; however, if they are inappropriate, they will not be published.    PLEASE post your e-mail in the comment section if you would like to network about a particular surname or topic. I will capture it for my use only and not include it when I publish your comment.
© 2020, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser


Sampson Frum Pool--A Civil War Letter



Martinsburg, May 23rd 1863

Dear Mother

I take this opportunity of writing you a few lines To let you know that I am well and hope that these few lines find you and all the rest of the Family well.  I Received a letter from you on the 20th Inst and was glad To Hear from you all.  I got a letter from Pap.  Since I have been here I am in Charles M. Addison's Train Driving from Hagerstown to Winchester.  John Hall, Z M Gidley (Zackquill Morgan Gidley) & Oliver dunn  They are in the same train that I am in   you wanted To Know when I am coming home  as far as that is concerned I dont know when I will come home  Tell Bill (assuming this is his brother, William Asby Pool) to get two scythes and a stick before Harvest for they will be hard to get  Tell Bill that I want him to put my colt in pasture at Dr Camels  Mother I don't want him rode much this summer  I cant get any paper or Envelopes out here or I would have answered your letter sooner  I send my love to all my inquiring friends & Receive a good share for your selves  I Remain your affectionate son until death

Samson F Pool

Write Soon

To Ann L Pool
Direct you letter to Martinsburg Berkeley Co Virginia

Wrote By  J W Hall  (perhaps John W Hall mentioned above)

****************

Civil War Letter --Flipside Blog written in 2009 
I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. All comments are welcome; however, if they are inappropriate, they will not be published.    PLEASE post your e-mail in the comment section if you would like to network about a particular surname or topic. I will capture it for my use only and not include it when I publish your comment.
© 2020, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser


Monday, March 23, 2020

2020 US Census




     As a genealogist, the 2020 census is a HUGE disappointment.  Not much information to be gleaned by future genealogists.   Today I learned I was laid off my job due to the coronavirus which is moving across the US, hospitalizing and taking lives.  I decided to take this opportunity to file my census on line.  

  The census will give information such as names, birth dates, age as of April 1, 2020, residence as of April 1, 2020, whether you are Mexican or Spanish decent (we all know what that is for), if any additional people are living in your house, if you own your house and finally your decent country.  At first I put in English....my grandfather was born in England.  I had to go back and change that to American.   This is sort of a trick question to genealogists.  Geesh....English, Danish, German, Scotland are some of my background.  Sort of a Heinz 57.  I guess sometimes it is better to not know too much info.

     No information as to number of years married, number of children, number of children alive, occupation.  In many respects this will be useless to future genealogists.  On the Flipside, know that these census reports were filed during the outbreak of the coronavirus and probably we should be blogging about that.

I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. All comments are welcome; however, if they are inappropriate, they will not be published.    PLEASE post your e-mail in the comment section if you would like to network about a particular surname or topic. I will capture it for my use only and not include it when I publish your comment.
© 2020, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser


Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Sarah Louise Harner Pool--My Paternal Great Great Grandmother


    
     Sidelined from work for a couple of weeks by Covid-19, I can turn my thoughts back to family history.  I had to do a search through my blog to see if I have ever written about my paternal great great grandmother, Sarah Louise Harner Pool (later changed by some to Poole).

    Sarah Louise Harner was born on October 23, 1843 in Fayette County, Pennsylvania to Philip William Harner and Sarah Fear (Fearer) Harner.  She joined two brothers:  Joseph L. Harner and George Washington Harner  and two sisters; Matilda Jane Harner and Susanna Harner.


     The only census I could locate for the Harner family in Fayette County, Pennsylvania was 1840.  It is listed as Phillip Herner living in Georges Township.  Two siblings born after Sarah list Oliphant Furnace, Georges Township, Fayette Couny, Pennsylvania.  By 1850, The Harners had removed to the Eastern District of Monongalia County, (West) Virginia ie Morgantown.  As shown on the map above, it was not a great distance for the move.

     It is unknown what prompted the move to the Morgantown area, although Philip was born there and his father, also named Philip, owned land there.  In fact, old Philip Harner is enumerated as a land owner in Monongalia County, (West) Virginia as early as 1802.  The Census records show that Philip's father died before 1840; however, his mother, Dorothy Harner was still living in the Eastern District until her death between 1860-1870.

     Morgantown was a growing area in 1850.  Public schools, two academies, steamboat transportation, roads, numerous churches, cultural programs, a newspaper and a town area built around High Street were in place.  During that decade the B&O train laid tracks through the area.  A stagecoach service was established.  As the town grew more doctors were available.  By the end of the decade, two stagecoaches were active in Morgantown to deliver passengers and mail.  This was Sarah Louise's world from age seven until her sweet sixteen.

A Little Harner History--Please excuse this digression


      Philip W and Sarah added two more children before leaving Pennsylvania; Mary Elizabeth Harner and Philip Fairchild Harner.  Once settled in Monongalia County, William Taylor Harner and Henry James Harner were born.  A stillborn daughter was delivered on March 5, 1858.  Sarah Louise had eight siblings to grow with and learn from.  As an older daughter, she probably helped her mother with cooking and cleaning and tending to her younger brothers and sisters.



     Philip William Harner was a blacksmith by trade.  As he acquired more land he also farmed.  The map above, 1885-1886, shows the land outside of Morgantown owned by the sons of Philip Harner. His son, William Taylor Harner owned the Old Harner Homestead.  I imagine those parcels of land were given by Philip to his sons.


Photo:

     One day while googling around the net, I happened upon a the National Register of Historic Places listing.  Of course I checked Monongalia County, West Virginia.  Lo and behold there was a listing for the Old Harner Homestead.  Probably a smaller house when Philip William Harner purchased the property in 1852.  How much of the present house was constructed by the Harners is unknown--I like to think all of it.  On a visit to Morgantown after finding this information, my brother and I drove to the house and it was FOR SALE.  Needless to say, we were inside that house the next day.  I have a Wiki piece on the net:  Old Harner Homestead.

Also a blog here on Flipside:  Road Warriors--The Old Harner Homestead.

Back to Sarah Louise Harner and Sampson Frum Pool

     How and when Sarah Louise met Sampson Frum Pool is lost in history.  Suffice to say, the Pool family was large, prominent and spread out over the Morgantown area.  They could have met at any number of venues and events.  I have noticed that I have not blogged about Sampson or any of my Pool/Poole ancestors.  I need to correct that deficiency.


     On May 26, 1866 in Monongalia County, West Virginia, twenty two year old, Sarah Louise Harner, married twenty three old, Sampson Frum Pool, son of William Lanham Pool and Ann Louise Frum Pool. The marriage was performed by Sampson's paternal grandfather, Reverend Asby Pool. 

Sampson Frum farm in red at top, his mother, Ann Pool's two properties at the bottom.
Shows relationship to Harner properties highlighted in yellow.

     Sampson and Sarah lived on a farm north of Morgantown in the Morgan District, almost to Easton, West Virginia.  Together they had eight children; Nettie M. Pool, Sarah Ann Pool, Jessica B. Pool (my paternal great grandmother), Olive Pool, Annabell Pool, Estelle Pool, Philip Albert Pool and Eleanor Pool.  The siblings appear to be close in their adult years, spending time together on many visits recorded by Sarah Ann and printed in the Charleroi, Pennsylvania newspaper.  Also, at some time after 1900, Pool changed to Poole in many documents.

     No stories have been passed down concerning Sarah Louise's life.  I imagine she was a typical farmers wife, tending to farm chores, raising eight children, baking, cooking, house cleaning and doing laundry from sun up to sun down.  Probably a regular church attender.  I do know stories regarding two of her daughters and they probably learned the behavior from their mother.  Sarah Ann kept a very clean house and would put newspaper down when people sat at the table to eat.  My paternal great grandmother lost her husband early and ran boarding houses to make financial ends meet.  She was quite a baker and later in life was a cook for a riverboat.

     As in the life of all, there are joys and sorrows.  Sarah Louise's journey was no different.

  • In 1878, Sarah's daughter, Estelle Pool, died of croup at eleven months.
  • In 1885 Sarah's father, Philip William Harner, died.
  • In 1887 Sarah's daughter, Sarah Ann Pool married John A. Pinyerd.
  • In 1891 Sarah's daughter Jessica B. Pool married George Ethelbert VanGilder.
  • In 1898 Sarah's daughter, Olive Pool married William Brooke Reeves.
  • In 1900 Sarah's mother, Sarah Fearer Harner, died.
  • In 1903 Sarah's daughter, Annabell Pool married Elias Blackshere Davis
  • In 1905 Sarah's daughter, Nettie Pool, died.
  • In 1909 Sarah's son, Philip Albert Pool married Viola Stevens.

     Sarah Louise lived to enjoy numerous grand children, especially those that lived in and near Morgantown.  

     On Tuesday, December 14, 1909, Sarah's husband of forty three years died.  The obituary mentions that Sampson had been in poor health for some time and had been moved to his daughter, Jessica Pool VanGilder's home in Sabraton, where he died from diabetes.  

     To date I have not been able to locate the 1910 census report for Sarah Louise.  Following Sampson's death, she may have continued to live on the family farm.  Her son, Philip Albert and daughter, Jessica VanGilder were living nearby. Or, perhaps the farm was sold and she moved between her two children's homes.





    In February 1911, she moved to live with her daughter, Sarah Ann Pinyerd in North Charleroi, Washington County, Pennsylvania.  Sarah Louise Harner Pool died there on Saturday, August 5, 1911 at the age of sixty eight from liver cancer.  Her body was brought back to Morgantown and laid out at her son, Philip Albert Pool's house.  The funeral service took place there under the leadership of Dr. Charles Kelley Jenness of the Jerome Park Methodist Episcopal Church.




     She was buried on August 7, 1911 beside her husband in Mount Union Cemetery, Monongalia County, West Virginia.

     Of note, all of the children of Sampson and Sarah Pool are buried in Mount Union Cemetery.  Annabell Davis, Sarah Pinyerd (no marker), Nettie Pool, Estelle Pool, Olive Reeves (no marker) and Eleanor Bashaw (no marker) are buried in the Pool lot.  Philip Albert Poole and Jessica VanGilder are nearby.



Additional Family Blogs on Flipside

Pool Family Reunion


Sarah Ann Pool Pinyerd  Perhaps her daughter, Viola.



I WOULD LOVE TO HEAR FROM YOU. All comments are welcome; however, if they are inappropriate, they will not be published.    PLEASE post your e-mail in the comment section if you would like to network about a particular surname or topic. I will capture it for my use only and not include it when I publish your comment.
© 2020, copyright Linda Hughes Hiser